Indian blog directory: an effort to list the best blogs

This is fourth post in the series on compilation of Indian blogs directory 2011. Today we share with you the results we have been able to achieve in compiling the Directory of Best Indian Blogs.

Believe us, we worked really hard in our effort to include as many good quality blogs as possible in the second edition of the Directory of Best Indian Blogs. At the end of the exercise, which we call Indian blogosphere survey, we scanned 30,000 blogs and ended up with about 650 blogs. As happened last time when we issued the first edition of the blog directory, we will be criticized for omitting some high quality blogs and including some ‘poor’ blogs. We sincerely apologize to the bloggers whose excellent blogs we could not reach, but we insist that each entry in the directory is a valuable blog.

See, what makes the task so voluminous
and why the 650 blogs are indeed so valuable

We admit that we have only been able to browse a small portion of Indian blogs – but we’re
sure of having seen a significant proportion of active Indian blogs. We have not come across any other such exercise in India. 


We had to leave out the majority of blogs that we browsed, for valid reasons. We also had to drop about a quarter of the blogs from the first edition of the Directory of Best Indian Blogs. Being irregular in posting was the biggest single reason for rejection, followed by major issues relating to loading, advertisements, navigation and readability. Some blogs had inappropriate content, some had turned totally into static websites, some had become private. 


We’ve accommodated blogs looking like web-magazines or non-blog sites when we found that they were regularly updated and had some element of interactivity.

Part of our data-sheet [blurred]
most blogs got rejected
on 1/more parameters

On quality, we need to concede that we couldn’t be too strict. We used a software and some statistical tools last time, but we realized that measuring quality in quantitative terms was fraught with strange inconsistencies. This time, our approach was more traditional. Bloggers whose blogs we’ve reviewed so far would vouch for it that we are very demanding when it comes to quality, especially of design and language. But if we applied those parameters in compiling a blog directory, we’d be left with only a dozen blogs. We didn’t want our exercise to be self-defeating. Hope, we make sense.


Some will question our calling the directory as Directory of Best Indian Blogs. We must make our stand clear as we do believe that the 650 blogs we have included in the directory are indeed among the best Indian blogs. These blogs meet a minimum standard of quality. They are regularly updated. They don’t have issues relating to readability. They do not have inappropriate content. Their design is not weird. They have at least some level of interactivity. Finally, the only site that manually checks so many Indian blogs has found them the best among the 30,000 that it scanned.  Hope, you don’t mind giving the ITB team a small bit of credit for their common sense, fairness and hard work. 


PS: In later years, the number of blogs in the Directory has come down to about 300 or less as we have applied stricter standards in scrutiny of blogs.

The vast variety of Indian blogs

This is the third post in the series on Indian blogs. Today we share with you the variety of Indian blogs and their categorisation in the Directory of Best Indian Blogs coming out on the 30th November.

Based on our experience while compiling the Directory of Best Indian Blogs in July 2011 and its updation now, we have tried to categorise the blogs according to their main theme(s).

This time, we have put blogs in more than one category when they have a good number of posts on a particular theme and will add value to that category if included there.

The categories are: art – audio-visual media - comments - culture - current affairs - economics – environment – expatriates - fashion - finance - food - health - improvia - information technology - personal - photo - social issues - sports - technical subjects and niche areas - travel
  • Blogs of general nature come under personal blogs category if they talk about 'me', 'my kids', 'my house', 'my life' and so on. The ones with posts that talk of 'you' and 'they' rather than 'me' tend to be categorised as comments blogs. Such blogs have opinions on anything on the earth – so this category is ‘free for all’. When personal blogs talk less of physical matter and mundane thoughts and more on self-improvement, life's aim and spirituality, they come under the category improvia. When personal blogs have comments on topical matters more than others, they get clubbed with more newsy blogs and make the category of current affairs blogs. Blogs that discuss social problems or promote social cause come under social issues category.
  • Art includes design and décor, drawings and cartoons. Culture  includes heritage and history.  Environment includes wildlife. 
  • A blog has been categorised as photo blog only when it either deals with the subject of photography or photography as an art form, or its primarily  content is photography. A blog using photos for supplementing travelogues, recipes etc is not included in this category.
  • Literary blogs include authors’ blogs, blogs with a large number of posts on fiction and poetry, and blogs with book reviews.
  • Economics category also includes blogs on business and finance, advertising, marketing and management.
  • Information technology blogs deal with software, hardware, gadgets and web. Highly technical IT blogs come under technical subjects category.
  • Technical subjects and niche areas is the category that includes blogs of highly technical nature and those with very narrow subject area.
 Beyond the Directory of blogs,

  • We have listed Indian blog platforms, blog aggregating sites and forums of good quality.
  • In addition, we have compiled a list of blogs on (i) jobs and exams related information and (ii) stock-market analysis. These blogs serve a useful purpose, are updated very frequently and need a good deal of effort on the part of blogger, but it is difficult to analyse their content for quality as they have a set language repeated over and over. Ignoring these blogs altogether seemed unfair, so we have listed them separately.
Many bloggers have not archived their blogs in a way that allows a reader to see the complete listing of their posts. Though we went back and forth inside multifaceted blogs to get a sense of content – and we also made site search - we might have missed a major topic in some cases. 
We had started with some more categories such as product reviews, management, poems, hobbies and religion, but had to give up mid-way when we faced too much overlap among categories. Personal and comments categories too could not be dissected beyond a point.
If your blog happens to be in the Directory and you feel that it has not been given proper category listing, do write to us by sending an email to kp.nd.2008@gmail.com.

The next post in this series will be on how much of the Indian blogosphere we could cover in our latest survey.

Trends in the Indian blogging scene

This is second post in the series on Indian blogs. Today we share with you the blogging trends we noticed while doing survey of the Indian blogosphere for updating the Directory of Best Indian Blogs.

  • There do not seem to be even a lakh [a hundred-thousand] blogs run by Indians and on India which are over a year old and are updated at least once a month in most part of their life.
  • A large number of bloggers have more than one blog. 
  • Most of the bloggers lose steam midway [details in this post on blogging habits]. 
  • Young adults – who have to deal with major turning points such as leaving school / college, getting / losing job, marriage, conception, birth of the first child, break-up - often give a pause to blogging and when they re-start it, they tend to shift the main theme of their blog.
  • Of all blogs, personal blogs seem to have the highest longevity.
  • Among niche segments, tech, travel and cookery bloggers flourish well. A large number of blogs on these subjects are well maintained and have supporting photos and large archives. They have high search rankings and get a good stream of visitors.
  • Indian bloggers have a strong presence in the global information technology blogosphere.
  • A good number of celebrities / public personalities stop blogging after a while or - if they become popular -  pose restrictions on interactivity by making the blog private or login-only.
  •  In most Indian blogs, the language quality is no issue. In sophistication, the language ranges from just passable to literary and academic.
  • Indian bloggers tend to be serious writers. They have opinion on any conceivable matter on the earth, especially India’s problems, social issues, human nature and life.
  • In personal blogs, young mommies like to write a lot about their growing kid(s) and their discovery of a new relationship.
  • Overall, money does not seem to be the prime motive behind blogging by Indians.
  • Only a few Indian blog have Google Page Rank more than 5 and respectable ranks in other search engines, Technorati and Alexa. Only a few get comments in hundreds.
  • In blog search, a few blogs appear again and again on the first page [or in the top 10-20]. As not many new blogs maintain high quality and regularity, established blogs face very little competition for popular search terms.
  • Most Indian bloggers are on Blogger platform [*.blogspot.com]. Wordpress is the second most-popular blogging platform. A small number of bloggers shift from Blogger to Wordpress platform; some of them come back. [The movement from Wordpress to Blogger is very rare.]  A few blogs on these platforms graduate to websites and/or website-like  independent URL. 
  • Bloggers from India usually forget to make their blog a part of their overall web presence; they rather shift to new formats such as Facebook and Twitter, and reduce or stop blogging. On the other end of the spectrum, some bloggers seem to get too pleased with their presence in 'modern' platforms and they over-burden their blogs with social media widgets.
  • The distinction between blogs, websites and blogzines is further diminishing as more blogs and websites have similar look and feel.
  • Most bloggers either do not care for design and search optimisation or do them excessively. A good number of blogs have too many widgets and animations. Some bloggers over-indulge in widgets and hurt the blog’s functionality.
  • Teens are the most experimental of all bloggers, in all aspect: technology, variety of topics, use of language and embellishment.
  •  A large number of bloggers make their own small communities and tend to visit only the blogs that belong to their 'kitty party'. Going by their commenting habits, it appears that they often play 'You scratch my back, and I'll scratch yours'. Many bloggers reciprocate badges.
  •  A number of competition sites operate in the Indian blogosphere. Some established as well as many new bloggers contribute to these sites on regular basis. In return, they get noticed and get to add badges on their blogs.
  • Some Indian portals offer blog pages. Bloggers on such portals become part of big blogging communities and tend to interact regularly with blogs within their community.
  • Blogs by newspaper and magazine columnists are usually well-composed and regular. In many cases, their blogs are replicas of their columns. These blogs have a big following.
 The next post in this series will be on the vast variety of Indian blogs that we noticed.